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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
name malvi, a taliban commander. as far as i could tell, it was a perfectly legal and good thing to do, but the blowback on the ground is something that -- can be furious and last friday i was at the pentagon talking to the joint chiefs legal advisor who we talked about this at length. one of the things that they try to do as they analyze and propose strike, what's the blowback going to be. >> on the ground. >> on the ground. you can hit a guy in the house, but if all the neighbors -- if that causes them to go join the taliban, you know, you have taken a big step backwards. he was trying to persuade me that they pay attention to that when they're looking at a proposed strike, but the problem is how can do you that from washington? very, very difficult. the evidence so far is in yemen, for example, enormous blowback. you know, the analysis that i've seen is that we've caused more harm than good there. >> ben, i wonder, the other -- there is blowback regionally, but there has been such a lack of discussion here, and i remember the "new york times" kill list story that raised hackles in t
said the taliban and al qaeda are two different elements. if we stay after killing bin laden, we have lost our purpose. he said the worst thing we can do is get bogged down without getting out. it wasn't that long ago, but it was interesting to look back a year and eight months ago to when bin laden was killed. i mean, at the time, anybody else think that maybe that would have meant we would come home from afghanistan? it seemed like one of the real possibilities that opened up with that almost unbelievable news on that cold night in may. but we did not leave afghanistan after this happened. this was roughly 600 days ago. we've got another 700 days ahead of us before the white house says this war will officially end, nearly two years from now. but how many american troops are left there between now and then? and what are those troops expected to do? how much fighting are they going to be doing? how much of our 11 and a half yearlong war is going to continue to result in americans getting hurt and killed between now and then? all of that remains to be decided. what is going to happen i
billion for them to be due to by the taliban. we will see a dramatic increase -- a decrease of american dollars and soldiers being sent to afghanistan over the next several years. $4,000,000,000.5000000000 dollars for them to continue to host: but you said earlier that aid will continue for at least 10 years. guest: i hope and expect that it will continue for the next 10 years. we should probably talk about where that is a good idea. afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a draw on strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. babalu remain a threat in that area for the force -- that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the worl
priorities backwards. if taliban takes control again in afghanistan, we won't have to worry about protecting drone bases or diplomats because we won't be there at all. and i think this is part of the unreality of the obama administration's approach there. the low troop numbers that they're contemplating, that they will be discussing with president karzai will not be any where near sufficient to accomplish our strategic objective, america's strategic objective which is defeating the taliban. and i think we're --. bill: it is fascinating. i apologize for the interruption how the events in benghazi are now shaping our foreign policy whether this administration wants to admit it or not. >> well that perhaps is the small glimmer of good news that they recognize that benghazi was a real debacle for our security policies for embassies overseas but the larger question here in afghanistan is the administration's unwillingness to do what we need to do to prevent 10 years of sacrifice and loss of life by our forces from simply being wasted if the taliban come back into power. bill: well this administra
, they were far from ready. on the agenda this week will be progress in talks with the taliban. insurgents will be sent a warning. if karzai and the kabul regime agree with the presence of a single american soldier, they will also be a responsible for future hostilities, casualties, and destruction. some hoped the meeting will mean troops will pack up and head home sooner. that might help the peace process. >> if international troops withdraw from the country, the jihad against international invaders will be totally or more than 90% over. >> this meeting will influence the number of soldiers president obama is willing to send home and the number president karzai is willing to tolerate. this has changed into a war of counterterrorism. the interest of afghanistan and america will not be easily disentangled. across the country, u.s. bases are disappearing. this week's meeting will help determine the direction they take and the speed with which they go. >> silvio berlusconi has said he will not lead the next italian government. he struck a deal with the italian far right party. there are elect
with the afghan taliban. drones have always been deeply unpopular with pakistanis because of civilian deaths because. now general stanley mcchrystal, in charge of forces in afghanistan, cautions about their overuse. but president obama has just named john brenan as the one he wants to run the cia and he has been one of the strongest advocates of drawn attacks as obama's counterterrorism chief. now more from the pakistani capital islamabad. >> the pakistani establishment have said the drone strikes are counterproductive because there is collateral damage. that collateral damage has now been established by the bureau of investigative journalism and the stanford report. so there is considerable criticism about the legality of those strikes. john brenan had already said there was no collateral damage in the drone strikes, something that is documented. the pakistanis are warning that it will jeopardize their own counterinsurgency strategies in the tribal areas. peace talks to stop the fighting in the central african republic have been delayed until the end of the week. meanwhile, thousands of peo
fr a pakistani teen-aged girl after she was shot in the head by the taliban. >> and u.s. suffers its worst year for whooping cough in nearly six decades. we'll take a look at numbers. >> i'm michaeliny. manufacturer has a problem with vehicles and say it's not their fault. what can be done so they can't get by with tkxbñ;x;x;x;x >>> a 15-year-old pakistani activist left a british hospital today. she was shot in the head by the taliban in october. militants attacked her because she advocated education for girls. queen elizabeth hospital provided video. she still needs to have reconstructive surgery on her skull but doctors say she did not suffer any brain damage. her family plans to remain in england. it's too dangerous for them to return to pakistan. >> fda proposing the most sweeping food safety rules in decades. new rules requiring farmers and food companies to be more vigilant in the wake of deadly outbreaks including requiring farmers to make sure workers wash hands, make sure irrigation water is lien and animals stay out of the fields. critics say changes are long overdue, ther
to by the taliban. we will see a dramatic decrease of american dollars and soldiers being sent to afghanistan over the next several years. host: but you said earlier that aid will continue for at least 10 years. guest: i hope and expect that it will continue for the next 10 years. we should probably talk about where that is a good idea. the fact is, afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a drone strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the world that puts the united states most at risk. host: a sovereignty issue for pakistan, but also, karzai is expected to bring up sovereignty issues for afgh
as separate compounds belonging to the pakistani taliban in south missouri stan. the taliban commander was reportedly among the dead. the ongoing drone attacks come days after a federal judge ruled the obama administration is under no obligation to publicly disclose their legal justification. the american civil liberties union and the new york times had filed a lawsuit under the freedom of information act demanding u.s. government disclose the legal basis for launching drone strikes overseas. the suit was filed after the u.s. kill the american-born cleric anwar al awlaki in yemen despite having never charged him with a crime. in upholding the obama at the ministration's right to secrecy, u.s. district judge colleen mcmahon expressed misgivings about the drone program itself writing -- the alice-in-wonderland nature some of the first details have emerged on the white house's effort to tackle gun control in the aftermath of last month's shooting massacre in newtown, connecticut. the washington buzz reports the task force overseen by vice- president joe biden is mulling proposals include
to the taliban, taking out a top militant commander in pakistan. he supplied money and weapons to taliban fighters who attacked u.s. forces in afghanistan. officials say five other people were killed in the strike, including one of nazar's aides. >>> we know that dallas cowboys lineman josh brent had a blood-alcohol level twice the legal limit when he crashed his vehicle last month, an accident that killed his friend and teammate, jerry brown. but now an autopsy found that brown was sober at the time of the crash. officials say brown's blood-alcohol was 0.056, well below the texas legal standards. >> neither wearing seat belts, as well. >>> another sports story, an inspiring one from southern new jersey. josh berelli is star of his high school team, averaging over 20 points a game and suffers from one of the rarest diseases on the planet that causes rashes and lesions. all he can do is take medication and spend eight minutes a day in a tanning booth. there will be much more on this story coming up on "good morning america." talk about rare. i believe he was the first diagnosed case in the
? >>> worldwide for the amazing triumph over the taliban. after they, of course, shot malala in the head. she has been discharged from the hospital. cnn national correspond respondent matthew chance is following developments from london. what is the hospital saying this morning? >> pretty good news malala yousefzai laying in the hospital since shot by the taliban, making a pretty good recovery. this is a picture of her walking out of her hotel room. speaking with nurses who have been giving medical care over the past several months. a statement saying malala is a strong young woman and worked hard with people caring for her to make excellent progress in her recovery. she will be staying at her parents' temporary home in birmingham in england, where the hospital is located. they have been flown out from pakistan. the father has been given a job in birmingham for the next three years as the consulate. they expect to stay there for the foreseeable future. she will be going back into the ward wards at the end of this month, beginning of next month to have reconstruction on her skull. a recovery, but
in response to gun violence. >>> the pakistani education crusader shot in the head by the taliban is now out of a british hospital. she was released yesterday. the teen will continue undergoing rehabilitation in the u.k. >>> google's ceo is visiting an unlikely place, north korea, a place that keeps a welded lid on technology information. bill richardson has been there several times. it's being called a private humanitarian visit, and it's not on behalf of the obama administration. sources say governor richardson could try to negotiate the release of an american prisoner who was captured there last month. >>> all right, the fiscal cliff, hill, slope, time bomb, whatever you want to call it, aren't you glad to be over the metaphor madness about what this thing is? >> kick the can down the road. >> it's just kicking the can down the road. >> kicking the can. >> we are done with kicking this can down the road. >> oh, yeah. the fiscal cliff turned into a can. too bad those metaphors aren't gone with the fiscal cliff. that's next. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa aut
, one of which killed a taliban commander. >>> 130 trained mountain rescuers are combing a five-mile area east of seattle. they are looking for this man, 29-year-old curt rupert of lake city, florida. he disappeared three days ago during a skydiving trip. friends say they last saw rupert jump when he -- rather when he jumped out of a helicopter above the cascade mountains. authorities still hoping to find him alive. they say his parachute may have snagged a tree on the way down. >>> and cnn has learned that tomorrow, president obama will announce chuck hagel as his nominee to be defense secretary. the former senator from nebraska is a vietnam war hero and served on capitol hill for more than a decade but his confirmation process isn't expected to be smooth. athena jones is at the white house and hagel, athena, has angered some lawmakers, many because of the positions he has taken up on middle east issues. what has he done that could cause challenges, say, for him here? >> reporter: well, that's right. even though this is a republican who served as nebraska senator for two terms,
negotiating power with the taliban. >> the position we take in showing that we are going to continue to complete this mission, the better the chances we have to ultimately achieve political reconciliation. >> the pentagon was only the beginning of the afghan president's visit to washington. >> our meeting, i believe, helped -- will help lay the ground work for president karzai's discussions tomorrow with president obama. >> sources say president karzai and his defense minister brought a wish list to the pentagon, drones, helicopters, and hardware to support their security forces. >> what we talked about yesterday was, you know, let's move beyond a wish list of equipment. >> the u.s. want assurances the terrorists won't set up troops in afghanistan after the troops leave. karzai agreed. >> be able to provide security to these people. >> but a recent pentagon reports that the afghan border patrol relies on the u.s. for even its most basic needs, food and water. it's rife with illiteracy, lack of accountability, and corruption. and these conditions are expected to endure beyond 2014. bu
head. she was stopped on a bus by taliban gunman. they asked to point out malala and when they did that, they shot her at point-blank range. she was medevaced here and she was in a hospital bed for several months now. they worked very hard on her and she's well enough to walk out there with the slight assistance of a nurse walking through corridors and even wave at the staff as she was discharged. she still is going to be receiving treatment as an outpatient, and there's lots of therapy to be done on eyesight and physical therapy and she'll have to be readmitted in a few weeks for reconstructive surgery on her skull which was shattered by the bullet wound. >> what's next for her? can she go to school? people want to support this young woman and the movement she's started there. >> yeah. i think there's no doubt she can continue her education. in fact, she's continuing it inside the hospital, and now at her temporary home in birmingham in central england. she's a very enthusiastic studious student. she was campaigning very vocally and articulating for women to be educated all over pakist
for afghan women as the taliban returns. i find that a very scary report. >> the other people scared are the pakistanis. >> right. >> looking at what's happening says kroog the border, if we are completely pulling out. what does it say about the surge and the american lives that were lost with that escalation? >> if you look at the pentagon's own most recent report on what's been the last six months in afghanistan, you will -- of the most recent -- the most repeat report from the pentagon on previous six months in afghanist afghanistan, you will see that the levels of violence that have returned to -- are now greater than presurge levels. this obviously brings us to the conclusion that the surge has made no difference. now, the military will disagree with that, and i would say the surge has made a difference in parts of afghanistan, in southern afghanistan, and helmand province especially where 20,000 marines were there. they're leaving soon. it did make a difference to some degree in kandahar, so i think the zero option is partly strategic. it was partly to negotiate with karzai to
was gunned down by taliban walked out of the hospital today. she will remain in britain as she continues to recover. jts back here in the states, the cdc is recording the biggest bump of flu for an extremely rough winter. >>> a bang-up week on wall street. now, back to "hardball. >>> welcome back to "hardball." the controversial new movie "zero dark thirty" about the hunt for osama bin laden has already racked up a slew of critical praise and oscar buzz, but it's also received some real world criticism from its depiction of torture as a key element in finding bin laden. now it has sparked a senate investigation. senators dianne feinstein, carl levin, and john mccain want to know whether the cia provided misinformation to filmmakers. in a statement yesterday the three senators wrote, given the cia's cooperation with the filmmakers and the narrative's consistency with past public misstatements by former senior cia officials, the filmmakers could have been misled by information they were provided by the cia. so what are the facts about the role enhanced interrogation played in the investiga
in afghanistan. in september his base was attacked by the taliban. it's his second tour of duty. >> if you are a parent or, you know, relation and the person is away like that in these incredibly dangerous and challenging things, i know you worry all the time. certainly every night, i worry. but, you know, he loves doing what he's doing. he's brilliant at it. keep his head down and protecting our troops on the ground. i constantly meet the families of those who have lost their sons or husbands or brothers or sisters. i have some understanding, at least, of what they go through. >> reporter: prince william has also been back at works a rescue helicopter pilot. even on new year's eve and new year's day, risking his own life to save other people. matt? >> all right. mi michelle kosinski at buckingham palace today. michelle, thank you. >>> by the way, we're learning mo r about that never-before-seen photo of diana on friday. >> this was taken before her marriage to prince charles and was marked "not to be published." a lot of people wondered about the man in the picture. adam russell. they wer
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)